Do You Like Me?

EDIT: This blog has MOVED. You’re on the old, dead blog. Everything (including this post) has been migrated onboard my website. Here’s the direct link:

http://scotthargisphoto.com/blog/

Update your bookmarks! See you there!

We now continue with our original programming….

Click Me, Like Me

I’m getting organized….and making Facebook my “ground zero” for workshop information. Updates on current and future workshops will appear on this new page, so “Like” it and stay up-to-date with what’s happening! Click the image above, and you’ll be there!

And…write something pithy on my wall while you’re there!

6 responses to “Do You Like Me?

  1. Like it????? I love it.

  2. Facebook? I would look into Google lots more interesting if your a photographer. Try out a hangout, would be awesome to communicate with your students!

  3. I could never “Like” you but I would G+ you in a milli-seceond.

  4. Yeah but did G+ ever change their copyright wording? Last I heard photographers got the very short end of the stick on G+.

  5. The terms of service for Facebook, Google and Yahoo (which covers Flickr) are similar.

    While Google’s usage license is perpetual, the usage is limited and can be revoked “This license is for the sole purpose of enabling Google to display, distribute and promote the Services and may be revoked for certain Services as defined in the Additional Terms of those Services.”

    Facebook’s usage license is “transferable and sub-licensable”

    And Flickr’s usage license is “perpetual, irrevocable and fully sublicensable” and they can modify your content as well.

    TOS Verbiage

    Facebook

    Sharing Your Content and Information

    [edited to replace lengthy legalese with a nice tidy link! – sh]

  6. There may be a segment of the population out there that flatly refuses to use Facebook, just as there are people who refuse to use Apple products (for some reason)…..but I think I’m comfortable missing that demographic.

    It’s my belief that the wording in the TOS of any of these sites is mainly to protect themselves from frivolous lawsuits. Technically, when they disseminate files across multiple servers, or internet “nodes”, it’s “publication” and could be construed as a copyright violation (under the same ridiculous mentality that allowed the McDonald’s coffee lawsuit to proceed in the early 90s). Can you imaging the shitstorm of bad press that would rain down on Google or Facebook if they truly ripped someone off by monetizing content? I’m not too concerned with it. At some point, you have to put your work out there to be seen.