Tag Archives: architecture

Eichler Living — with building Lab

EDIT: This blog has MOVED. You’re on the old, dead blog. Everything (including this post) has been migrated onboard my website. Here’s the direct link:

http://scotthargisphoto.com/blog/

Update your bookmarks! See you there!

We now continue with our original programming….

BL_07

If you’ve been seeing a lot of building Lab work here this year, it’s because Stephen Shoup and his team have been on a tear – lots of amazing projects, and the recognition that comes with doing fantastic work.

This project is, in many ways, the epitome of what Stephen is all about. A Joseph Eichler home in California’s Marin County, this structure has seen extensive work but still feels 100% authentic. We shot this house over the course of two and a half days in November and created a set of photos I’m quite proud of. More photos, and some behind-the-scenes, after the jump!

Lighting Interiors – 2nd Edition is Live!

EDIT: This blog has MOVED. You’re on the old, dead blog. Everything (including this post) has been migrated onboard my website. Here’s the direct link:

http://scotthargisphoto.com/blog/

Update your bookmarks! See you there!

We now continue with our original programming….

cover_small_01

Almost a year in the making…it’s here! I’ve given “The Essential Guide to Lighting Interiors” a vigorous overhaul, doubling the page count (277 pages…yikes!) and adding four new chapters as well as a bonus section at the end.

If you’re not familiar with it, this is an eBook (PDF download, click here to buy it) that covers lighting techniques for interiors photography, with a strong bent towards real estate photography. Small flash is used throughout, and the photos are shot and presented with either zero photoshopping, or extremely minimal re-touching (which gets discussed every time). My philosophy with photography, and especially for real estate photography, is to make a deliverable photo entirely on location, so that I can produce a JPG with absolutely minimal RAW adjustments  — or maybe none at all — the least time spent in post-production possible.

Details, photos, and a sample page, click here!

San Francisco Swank by Muratore

EDIT: This blog has MOVED. You’re on the old, dead blog. Everything (including this post) has been migrated onboard my website. Here’s the direct link:

http://scotthargisphoto.com/blog/

Update your bookmarks! See you there!

We now continue with our original programming….

Millenium_11I found myself back in the SF Millenium Tower at the end of October, shooting a very nice residence by my friends at Muratore Corp. We shot the spaces “straight” and then did a round of lifestyle images. Lots of photos, write-up, and behind-the-scenes images, after the jump!

New Work from Scott Hargis Photo

Composite

It’s that time….I’ve posted a new quarterly portfolio at www.scotthargisphoto.com.

New work from Jennifer Hoey Interiors, building Lab, Baran Studios Architects, Muratore Corp., and many more! It’s an amazing symbiotic relationship…my clients produce killer interiors and architecture, which provides the raw material for my camera, which leads to photographs that (hopefully) inspire yet more great design…

Some terrific projects are on the horizon, stay tuned!

Lake Tahoe Home by Shelterwerkes

Kitchen by Shelterwerkes

We used no fewer than 6 or 7 lights (strobe, and continuous) to bring out the warmth and details in this kitchen.

On a weekend in July, I drove up to Truckee, California to shoot a Lake Tahoe-style project by Shelterwerkes Architecture. We made a long day of it on Saturday, and wrapped up Sunday morning (just in time for me to catch a flight out of Reno for LA).

Full write-up, lots of photos, and lighting notes…after the jump!

New Work: Summer 2013

WordpressClick the image to view the complete collection.

This late-summer portfolio features images from the following:

Handel Architects  •  Building Lab  •  Shelterwerkes Architecture  •  Atria Senior Living  •  Kelly Scanlon Interiors   •  Dogtown Development  •  Baran Studio Architects

Thanks for producing such amazing material for me to photograph!

Zig Zag Towers by MZ & Partners

zigzag01

While I was in Qatar last month, I found myself unexpectedly face to face with the Zig Zag Towers (MZ & Partners), while shopping for a gift (a crazy thing happened on the way to the store….)

The official name is West Bay Lagoon, referring to the overall complex of residential, shopping, office and restaurants, but it’s universally referred to as the ZigZag Towers.

I immediately knew I wanted to shoot it, and with dusk only an hour away I asked my driver to cruise around in circles for a while as I craned my neck and tried to find a decent POV to shoot from. The building is surrounded by a sea of construction, and there were unsightly occlusions that eliminated all but a vew vantage points. Eventually I settled on a spot next to the approach road. I grabbed my tripod, camera, and laptop and spent the next hour and a half sweating on the sidewalk across the street, waiting first for the light to be right, and then (feverishly) for the perfect combination of taillights to create a red swoosh up the road.

Later that week, I again found myself unexpectedly looking at another angle on this remarkable structure, and again I changed some plans in order to shoot it.

zigzag02

There are actually two of these (of course: it’s the Gulf, after all) but neither of my vantage points offer even a hint of the other one, sadly.

And while we’re on the topic of tall buildings in Doha, here’s a little architectural porn:

zigzag03

Thats the Tornado Tower, center (CICO Consulting Doha / SIAT Architekten + Ingenieure), with the Palm Tower (MZ & Partners again) on the left. The fuzzy area on the Palm Tower is the reflection of the Burj Qatar, which is just out of frame on the right. That’s a stunning structure that will just have to wait for my next trip to Doha!

New Work Spring 2013

Composite

It’s that time — I’ve updated the portfolios and collected my best from the past 3 months into a new “New Work” gallery. Check it out here!

Pediatric Office by Martinkovic Milford

If you follow my blog, you know I love bold design. Bold colors, bold shapes, bold ideas. So when I saw the scouting photos of this San Francisco pediatrician’s office, I knew I was in for a treat.

Justin Martinkovic (Martinkovic Milford Architects) used both shapes and colors to define this space, as you can see below. This office is inside a building best described as, ummm…..Soviet-Style. It’s about as non-descript as it gets, on the outside, and on the inside, it gets even more bland. But you open the door to this office, and WHAM!

To make the shot above, the camera was parked directly in the door, and at least 20 people walked by. Not one person failed to say something along the lines of “Whoa….”

To call this a lighting challenge is putting it mildly. For the lighting geeks who read this blog, I’ll just say that in addition to at least a couple of Arri’s, there are 2 strobe heads and 4 speedlights involved. The speedlights really earned their keep, because I don’t know another way to get good light above a suspended valence like this one.

The butterfly motif starts out near the base of the glass panel to the right of the receptionist’s desk, as a cocoon. Colorful decals work their way up the panel until the butterflies morph into beautiful little stamped-metal cutouts, suspended from the ceiling and floating away towards the right side of the waiting room. The effect is quite charming, and I saved the butterfly detail shot for last.

I kind of love this shot. We used continuous lighting to put highlights on the butterflies, so they would pop out from the green ceiling. A (tightly) bounced light from underneath put the shadows above them, which was a last-minute bit of inspiration. Here’s a detail crop:

All in all, I have to say this was one of the most satisfying days of photography I’ve had in a long while!

Lighting For Real Estate Photography – Video Launch!

EDIT: This blog has MOVED. You’re on the old, dead blog. Everything (including this post) has been migrated onboard my website. Here’s the direct link:

http://scotthargisphoto.com/blog/

Update your bookmarks! See you there!

We now continue with our original programming….

Well —- we’re live!

Click the image above to go to the video website. They’re ready to play! A number of things conspired to move our launch date up from March 1st (which was seriously sandbagging anyway) to TODAY, including a pretty kick-ass web design group that came in way ahead of schedule.

So, without further ado — we’re launching. Registration is $175, gets you unlimited streaming access to all 21 videos (about 3 hours’ worth). Here’s the table of contents:

  • Start Here
  • Fundamentals
  • Use This
  • Let’s Take a Walk
  • Wake Up
  • Look Out!
  • Living Large
  • Dinner Party
  • Let’s Flush This Out
  • Eat at Joe’s
  • Here and Here and Here and Here
  • Wide Open Spaces
  • Into the Night
  • Fin

Then come seven “shorts” (plus an introduction) covering little tips and tricks that were too long to include in a “regular” episode, but too good to just leave out altogether. Stuff like mirror reflections, color casts from yellow walls, stainless steel, etc. etc.

I think it’s pretty comprehensive. People looking to be told what exact exposure settings to use, or what flash power settings, are going to be disappointed, because these videos concentrate much more on the process, the strategy, behind those decisions, rather than just reciting whatever was going on in any one particular shot. That sort of thing is useless, in my opinion, because no two situations are the same. Better to understand the why of what to do, rather than what someone else did, in some other room.

So the early episodes go into exhaustive detail about what’s going on. As we progress to the more challenging stuff, I drop some of the basic stuff and focus on what’s new and unique to the situation. Whenever possible, I present a simple one or two-light solution, and then build to a more elegant solution.

I hope you like them. Malia Campbell and I put in a TON of work on this. Many, many two and three-hour Skype calls, hours of writing out detailed episode treatments, lots of favors called in from clients (we got some outstanding locations), and some brutally long days of shooting and editing. Malia did a stellar job of capturing the rooms, and the process, and kept me from rambling incoherently and diluting the message (as I’m prone to do). We’d do a take, and I’d be like “That was great!”. Malia would shake her head, and say, “Do it again. Leave out the crap about _____ and ______ — that’s off-topic. Stay with what you’re doing here, now. Ready? Rolling!”

And we’d do it again. And again. Until we had something that was clear, concise, and really illustrated the point I wanted to make.

I hope you like them. Let me know what you think in the comments!