Tag Archives: san francisco

San Francisco Swank by Muratore

EDIT: This blog has MOVED. You’re on the old, dead blog. Everything (including this post) has been migrated onboard my website. Here’s the direct link:

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We now continue with our original programming….

Millenium_11I found myself back in the SF Millenium Tower at the end of October, shooting a very nice residence by my friends at Muratore Corp. We shot the spaces “straight” and then did a round of lifestyle images. Lots of photos, write-up, and behind-the-scenes images, after the jump!

San Francisco Residential by Baran Studios

Baran_ark Matt Baran (Baran Studio Architects) has been killing it lately! Between some fantastic residential work in Oakland’s “Bordertown” neighborhood that recently won a Citation Award at the East Bay AIA Awards (with photos by yours truly) to the WordPress campus that got the attention of the industry, Matt is really on a roll.

Which brings us to this most recent project in San Francisco’s Potrero Hill neighborhood. Matt re-designed the structure and added a pop-out bay window that has real chutzpah!

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San Francisco Residential by Andrew Morrall Architect

EDIT: This blog has MOVED. You’re on the old, dead blog. Everything (including this post) has been migrated onboard my website. Here’s the direct link:

http://scotthargisphoto.com/blog/

Update your bookmarks! See you there!

We now continue with our original programming….

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When superior architecture meets fine craftsmanship, you get the raw material for great photographs. So when architect Andrew Morrall asked me to shoot a new residential remodel that featured the cabinetry work of Hendrik Furhmeister, I knew from the first look that this would be a winner. More photos, more words, after the jump

SF Millenium Tower by Handel Architects

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I’ve shot the inside of this building many times, but I’ve never needed a good photo of the outside. Earlier this year, I decided I ought to make one, anyway. I spent a couple of Sunday afternoons wandering around the neighborhood, looking suspicious, scouting for locations to shoot from. Eventually I settled on the eighth floor of a building occupied by a global hedge fund management company.

They wouldn’t mind letting a random photographer run around their building, right? [#sarcasm]  As it turns out, it was actually fine. Getting access to a shooting location usually comes down to asking (the right people, in the right way), figuring out the process, and then following it to a “T”. I worked with the building management, and the tenant (the hedge fund people) and while it took a couple of weeks and some paperwork, eventually I got everything I had asked for: access for several hours, at two different times.

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As you can see from the construction, this angle won’t be available for much longer. The new Transbay Tower and transportation hub going into a 2-block piece of the SoMA district will soon occlude the gorgeous blue and white Millenium. At least from this viewpoint.

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First Prize!

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The photo above was just sent to me by my client Building Lab, along with a note explaining that they won First Prize (Residential, $100k – $250k) in last years “Remmie” awards, with a project I photographed! Congrats to the incredibly talented folks over at BL, especially Stephen Shoup, and Hide Kawato!

The Remmies are the annual NARI contest, but sadly, the San Francisco NARI chapter’s website is pretty sorry, so almost no one knows about the awards or who wins (the last time they updated the awards section was 2010). Note to sfbanari.org: The Internet can be a very powerful tool. You should check it out.

Snarkiness aside, NARI is a good organization and I’m especially pleased to have photographed the First Prize winning project for three consecutive years. I wonder which of my projects this year will be the winner?  😀

Here’s a photo from the Building Lab’s First Prize winning project:

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Highrise Residential — San Francisco’s North Beach

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One from the archives… About six months ago I spent two days with Muratore Corp, photographing one of their projects in San Francisco’s trendy North Beach neighborhood. This was one of the best projects I’ve ever shot with Muratore, and there have been a few good ones!!

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One of the great aspects of this remodel was the variety and quality of the materials. Rich wood cabinetry (Walnut and Maple), stainless steel, Carerra Marble, granite, and even Ostrich Skin all make appearances.

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One thing that made this a really interesting shoot was the fact that there were two strong elements in the place that were holdovers from the previous incarnation of the condo. In  1999, this place was “done” by Barry Brukoff, a Sausalito-based interior designer, and photographed for Architectural Digest by none other than Mary E. Nichols.

When the unit was sold around 2010, the coffee table and a set of large glass sculptural pieces (visible at the far left of the kitchen photo, above) were deemed too heavy to move, and so they stayed behind and were incorporated into the new owners’ plans. Cindy Bayon, of Muratore, did a radical renovation that included moving the fireplace, no small feat in a high-rise….

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Here are a few behind-the-scenes shots, including one of me, comparing my living room photo, with the view of Coit Tower, to Mary Nichols’.

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San Francisco Kitchen & Bath: Leslie Arnold, Part Two

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A few posts back, I chronicled a recent shoot with architect Leslie Arnold – a kitchen/bath remodel in San Francisco. Today, here’s another one, with a distinctly different flavor.

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Unlike the other project, which was a sort of Victorian-meets-country blend, this was Mission all the way. Arched doorways, stucco, smallish rooms….and Leslie introduced an Arts & Crafts flavor to the kitchen.

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For the lighting geeks: The shot above involved gelling all the under-cabinet lights minus green (or magenta) to bring the fluorescent tubes back to something close to daylight. We introduced some flash from the left side down near the fridge, and there’s also continuous light in the rear left corner as well as the foreground. A lot of careful positioning of cards and some white reflectors got everything under control.

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With the kitchen done, we moved into the bath, where Leslie had cast off all pretense of Mission style and gone 100% contemporary. This is the epitome of crisp! Green glass tile, white CeasarStone vanity top, and rich wood cabinets. The little scrubby was a last-minute addition to the styling that I just couldn’t resist.

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All in all this was a really satisfying project to shoot, thanks to Leslie’s great work and some excellent collaborative atmosphere.